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Companion Animal

Adolph l Bushby l Chiaramonte l Clifford l Goodrich l Hess l Jurney l Miller l Noxon l Rosenfeld l Rosenthal l Schmitt l Shih l Siracusa


Chris Adolph, DVM, MS, DACVM (Parasitology)
Veterinary Specialist, Zoetis, Florham Park, New Jersey

SPONSORED BY Zoetis

Cats Get Parasites Too!
Most veterinarians that have been in practice for any length of time have encountered many client misconceptions surrounding feline health care. It truly is an “out of sight, out of mind” phenomenon. The first step in correcting these misconceptions so that our feline patients can receive the best health care possible is for the veterinarian to truly understand parasite prevalence and difficulties surrounding detection. Once the veterinarian understands that, based on risk factors, cats are at risk for acquiring heartworms, intestinal parasites, fleas, and ticks. Ectoparasites are more easily found, however, fastidious grooming habits occasionally make demonstration impossible. Likewise, our ability to detect intestinal parasites and heartworms is even more difficult. This leads the veterinarian to believe prevalence is much lower than it really is. A veterinarian armed with this information can have an intelligent conversation with the pet owner and stress the need to perform diagnostics. We need to discuss the need for proper diagnostics, treatments, and preventives with all cat owners and start debunking some of these long held myths.

Parasites in Practice
Parasite detection, treatment, and prevention is one of the best ways to keep animals healthy. Using the best medical practices, formulating written protocols for diagnosis, treatment and prevention, tracking compliance, limiting inventory to the single best drug for each use, and educating staff are some ways to make these services as good for our practice as they are for our patients.

Trends in Parasitology: New Solutions to Old Problems
Our ability to diagnose certain parasites has improved over time, but is still limited by a number of factors. Ability to recover diagnostic stages, length of prepatent period, and host-parasite interactions are but a few considerations when determining if the result of the diagnostic test performed is accurate. In this presentation we will cover new information regarding the diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis as well as selected intestinal helminths in small animal practice.

Zoonosis: Parasites & Vector-borne Disease Agents: Protecting the 2-legged & 4-legged Family Members
Having conversations with clients regarding zoonotic pathogens can be uncomfortable. But a thorough understanding of these complexities can dramatically increase the human-animal bond. The last thing we want is a human family member acquiring a zoonotic pathogen because preventable steps were not taken. If we educate our owners properly, they will be appreciative and do everything possible to keep all family members safe. We will cover several prevalent pathogens, their vectors, at steps in the cycle where we can prevent transmission. 



Phil Bushby, DVM, MS, DACVS
Marcia Lane Endowed Chair of Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Jackson, Mississippi

Efficient Spay Neuter Surgery
Veterinary surgeons in high-volume spay neuter clinics use many techniques that are fundamentally different from the techniques generally taught to students in veterinary school. Why is that? And, how are the techniques different? Through powerpoint and video presentations we will answer these questions. Participants will leave the presentation with a full understanding of the efficient surgical techniques used in high-volume spay neuter clinics and the ability to implement these techniques in the private practice setting.

Unusual Spay Neuter Surgery
How many times have you heard someone say, “It is just a spay” or “It is just a castration?” While ovariohysterectomy and castration are the most common surgical procedures performed in private small animal veterinary practice, not all spays or neuters are the same. Some animals presented for routine sterilization are not at all routine and may be challenging. Through powerpoint and video presentations we will discuss and demonstrate the surgical techniques used in the obese patient, the patient with pyometra, and the cryptorchid patient. Participants will learn about uterus unicornis and hermaphrodites and leave with a full understanding of how to perform flank spays and how to locate a testicle in an abdominal cryptorchid.

Preventing and Managing Spay Neuter Complications
We would like to think that surgical complications never occur, but they do, even for the most experienced surgeon in the most commonly performed procedures. We will explore techniques to minimize complications during ovariohysterectomy and castration and learn how to manage complications when they occur. Through powerpoint and video presentations participants will learn how to minimize and manage intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage, dehiscence and ovarian remnant and will learn techniques to minimize tissue trauma thereby minimizing postoperative pain.

Review of Spay Neuter Research
Recent veterinary literature related to spay neuter has caused veterinarians to question the traditional approaches to sterilization of dogs and cats. Some in the profession advocate delaying spay neuter later than the traditional age of 6 months, others advocate early age or pediatric spay neuter. Who is correct? Is there a single recommendation that can be made for all dogs and cats related to the age of ovariohysterectomy or castration? We will discuss several of the articles that have contributed to the confusion. Participants will leave with a better understanding of at what age to perform these surgeries and how to make spay neuter recommendations to their clients.

Pediatric Spay Neuter
Sterilizing puppies and kittens as young as 6 to 8 weeks of age is becoming very common in animal shelters and high-volume spay neuter clinics. Veterinarians who routinely perform pediatric spay neuter find that the procedures in the pediatric patient are much easier to perform and that the patients recover much faster and with few complications than when the surgeries are performed in the patient that is 6 months old or older. Through powerpoint and video presentations we will discuss and demonstrate the surgical techniques used to spay and neuter pediatric dogs and cats.

The Association of Shelter Veterinarians’ Medical Care Guidelines for Spay Neuter Programs
In 2008, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians first published Medical Care Guidelines for spay neuter programs. That document was updated during 2014 and 2015 and the revised guidelines were published in 2016. The 2016 version of the guidelines is intended to be appropriate in any environment that performs spays and neuters of dogs and cats. Through a powerpoint presentation we will discuss those aspects of the guidelines that are most practical and relevant to be implemented in a private practice setting.




Deirdre Chiaramonte, DVM, DACVIM, CCRT, CVA
Owner/Operator, NYC Mobile Vet and Director of Clinical Studies, Assisi Animal Health, New York, New York
SPONSORED BY Assisi

Introduction to Rehabilitation & Modalities
This lecture is an introduction to the field of rehabilitation, the importance, and what it takes to be successful right in your own practice! We will cover common modalities (NPAIDs) used to relieve pain, strengthen muscles and improve endurance.

Managing Canine and Feline Arthritis
How many times have you heard someone say, “It is just a spay” or “It is just a castration?” While ovariohysterectomy and castration are the most common surgical procedures performed in private small animal veterinary practice, not all spays or neuters are the same. Some animals presented for routine sterilization are not at all routine and may be challenging. Through powerpoint and video presentations we will discuss and demonstrate the surgical techniques used in the obese patient, the patient with pyometra, and the cryptorchid patient. Participants will learn about uterus unicornis and hermaphrodites and leave with a full understanding of how to perform flank spays and how to locate a testicle in an abdominal cryptorchid.

Rehabilitation of the Front Limb & Hind Limb
This lecture reviews how to treat common issues of the front and hind limbs, improving function, strength and managing pain. It highlights exercises for prevention of injury, managing osteoarthritis and post-operative rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation of the Neurological Patient
This lecture highlights treatment of common issues in neurological patients, including improving function, strength and managing pain. It highlights exercises for prevention of re-injury and post-operative rehabilitation of the ataxic to paralyzed patient.

Pain and Modulation
Understanding pain mechanisms is a requisite for the best pain management. This lecture will explore fundamentals of pain pathophysiology. Advances in pain recognition and pain scoring will be discussed. We will cover pharmaceuticals and modalities (NPAIDs) to provide multimodal treatment.

Acupuncture
This lecture is a review of the current understating of how acupuncture works in the body and its influence on healing and pain.





Craig Clifford, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology)
Medical Oncologist, Hope Veterinary Specialists, Malvern, Pennsylvania

Recent Advancements in Oncology
This lecture is designed to highlight several new and novel diagnostics/therapies in veterinary oncology to include: Tanovea for dogs with Lymphoma; CADET novel diagnostic for the diagnosis of bladder cancer; Oncept Lymphoma Vaccine and Osteosarcoma Vaccine.

Controversies in Oncology Part 1: Lymphoma
This lecture will discuss several controversies within the diagnosis and treatment of lymphoma to include: staging, phenotyping, monoclonal antibodies and modified CHOP protocols

Controversies in Oncology Part 2: Mast Cell Tumors
This lecture will discuss several controversies within the diagnosis and treatment of mast cell tumors to include: staging, grading schemes (2 tier vs 3 tier), mast cell tumor panels and Palladia.

Controversies in Oncology Part 3: Metronomic Therapy
This lecture will discuss the evidence based medicine approach to the judicious use of metronomic therapy in our veterinary patients.

Tanovea: A New Drug in the Battle against Lymphoma
This lecture covers the new lymphoma drug Tanovea to include the current data behind the drug, mechanism of action, administration and anticipated side effect profile.

Treatment of Anorexia and Vomiting Through the Eyes of an Oncologist
This lecture will cover the causes of anorexia and vomiting in oncology patients and the multiple therapy options currently available and those soon to be in our hands.




Zachary Goodrich, VMD, DACVS-S
Staff Surgeon, AVETS, Monroeville, Pennsylvania

Labradors, Bulldogs, and Yorkies, Oh No! Management of Laryngeal Paralysis, Brachycephalic Airway Disease, and Tracheal Collapse (Parts 1 & 2)
This two-part lecture will focus on laryngeal paralysis, brachycephalic airway disease, and tracheal collapse. Diagnosis and treatment (both medical and surgical) will be discussed with emphasis on what can be done in a primary care facility. Appropriate owner education will also be highlighted.

A Beginner’s Guide to Laparoscopy
This lecture will serve as an introduction to any veterinarian who is interested is laparoscopy. Basic equipment and techniques will be discussed along with procedures that could be done in a general practice.

Fracture Decision Making for the General Practitioner
This lecture is for both the orthopedic inclined and averse general practitioner. The decision making process that should be applied to fractures will be discussed. Do’s and do not’s of fracture management and repair will also be discussed.

Wound Management (Parts 1 & 2)
This two-part lecture will focus on all aspects of wound management, including initial care, decision making for ongoing treatment, and closure options. This lecture is considered relevant for both veterinarians and veterinary technicians.




Rebecka Hess, DVM, DACVIM
Professor and Chief of Internal Medicine, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I131 for Treatment of Hyperthyroid Cats

This talk will review the diagnostic approach and therapeutic options for treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. Advantages and disadvantages of each treatment modality will be discussed. Radioactive iodine treatment will be emphasized, and pre-referral evaluation as well as after care and follow-up will be reviewed. A case of a hyperthyroid cat will be presented.

An Update on Addison’s Disease
This talk will include a detailed description of the diagnostic evaluation of a specific dog with Addison’s disease. Various diagnostic approaches that can be taken before performing an ACTH stimulation test will be discussed. There will be an emphasis on how to taper DOCP to optimally treat a dog with Addison’s disease.

Demystifying the Challenge of Diagnosing Cushing’s Disease
A case based discussion of Cushing’s disease will be presented, and treatment as well as monitoring will be emphasized. The talk will focus on using trilostane for treatment of Cushing’s disease, but other treatment modalities will also be included.

Treatment of Cushing’s Disease
A case based discussion of Cushing’s disease will be presented, and treatment as well as monitoring will be emphasized. The talk will focus on using trilostane for treatment of Cushing’s disease, but other treatment modalities will also be included.

How to Treat and Monitor Dogs and Cats with Diabetes
While lymphoid neoplasia is remarkably common, definitive diagnosis can be challenging for the general practitioner. We will utilize numerous real cases to focus our discussion on the varied presentation, appearance, and progression of lymphoid malignancies, and how laboratory data, cytologic findings, and ancillary tests can be best utilized in developing an accurate diagnosis.

Cytology Cases from the Front Lines
The use of various insulin products for treatment of diabetes will be discussed. Different methods for monitoring how effective the treatment is will be presented. The approach to improving diabetic treatment, when it is ineffective will be reviewed.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: How to Treat it Best
Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis requires emergency and intensive care. New practical insights into the successful treatment of this condition will be discussed.




Carrie Jurney, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology)
President, Jurney Veterinary Neurology, Redwood City, California

Spinal Localization: Tips, Tricks and a Review (Parts 1 & 2)

Learn to perfect your spinal localization skills! This lecture series takes you step by step through the pathophysiology and relevant neuroanatomy of lesions in each spinal segment. A heavy emphasis is placed on practical applications and neurologic exam findings. Copious video examples of each neurologic exam finding are included and Dr. Jurney will share tips and tricks from her experience as a clinical neurologist. Part 1 of this lecture series will talk about the practical neuroanatomical structures involved in spinal lesions, and review neuro exam findings for the C1-5 and C6-T2 spinal segments. Part 2 will continue our journey through the spine by covering T3-L3 and L4-S1 spinal segments. Less straightforward presentations like spinal shock, Schiff-Sherrington syndrome and ascending/descending myelomalacia will also be reviewed.

Don’t Let Vestibular Disease Spin You Around
Peripheral? Central? Paradoxical? Vestibular lesions can be a confusing thing. In this lecture, Dr. Jurney will break down the localization of these patients step by step. We’ll also touch on the most common differentials or each localization and their treatments.

Medicinal Marijuana in Veterinary Medicine
Medicinal marijuana is a hot topic in medicine these days. In this lecture, Dr. Jurney will cover the theoretic basis for medical marijuana so you can be prepared when attacked by Dr. Google in the exam room. Other considerations such as physiology of the endocannabinoid system, bioavailability of cannabinoids, toxicity, current cannabis based drugs and drug trials, delivery mechanisms and OTC supplements will also be covered.

Shake, Rattle and Roll: Seizures and How to Treat Them
Seizures are an incredibly common presenting sign in our patients. In this lecture we will discuss the causes, diagnostics, and treatment of seizures. Treatment discussion will include a review of emergent and maintenance drug therapy, as well as a discussion of diet therapy, surgery, supplements and acupuncture.

Portrait of a Vertebrae: Spinal Radiology
Let’s be honest – most of you don’t have an MRI or CT scanner at your practice, but that doesn’t mean you can’t image the spine! In this lecture, learn how to take excellent spinal films to maximize the utility of this diagnostic. We will also cover the diseases that can and cannot be diagnosed by radiographs, with case-based examples. Diseases covered include intervertebral disc disease, discospondylitis, neoplasia, trauma, wobblers, and vertebral malformation.




Matt Miller, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Cardiology)
Director of Cardiology Service, VETMED, Phoenix Arizona
SPONSORED BY Ceva

Heartworm University Parts 1-6
This program, designed by the American Heartworm Society, is aimed at the practicing veterinarian, maintaining a strong practical clinical emphasis. The course is comprehensive but varies through the day making points using case examples, videos, new research data, and interactive technology. The interactive nature allows the day to be tailored around the specific needs of each audience. A strong effort is put forth by the cardiologists teaching the course to make all aspects relevant to those who see heartworms daily and those who want to learn more about a disease that is less common in their region. Topics to be covered while addressing specific cases and client/veterinarian questions will include: history and pathophysiology of heartworm disease, disease differences in dogs and cats, diagnostics and testing, heartworm-positive pet treatment protocols and new knowledge and controversy in treatment options, preventative care and resistance.





James Noxon, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)
Morrill Professor, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Updated on Demodicosis in the Dog and Cat
It turns out that there is more to demodicosis than just D. canis. In this session, we’ll discuss several new paradigms for demodectic mange. We’ll chat about various clinical syndromes the different mites can cause, the important (new) considerations in diagnosis, and then we’ll talk treatment… and yes, there are some important new things to consider!

Important Considerations for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis – Part 1
Are you tired of dealing with itchy dogs this season? We know that they seem to be everywhere. This session will address the keys to approaching these cases and getting the patient/client ready for the best treatments.

Important Considerations for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis – Part 2
This session will cover the four treatment options for atopic dermatitis. We’ll use some case examples to help understand when each option might be the best choice for different patients. We’ll also consider the long-term management of atopic patients…something that is often overlooked.

Best Practices for Otitis Externa: Getting Started on the Right Foot
Otitis externa is one of the top two reasons dogs are presented to veterinarians. In this session, we’ll discuss the best clinical guidelines for managing otitis externa. Topics of discussion will include understanding the pathogenesis of otitis, key diagnostics required for successful treatment, and client education and management.

Best Practices for Otitis Externa: Maximize the Value of Your Treatment
Picking a medication off the shelf in your pharmacy is not going to ensure success in treating otitis. In this session, we’ll talk about some of the keys to help you make wise choices and how to allow that choice to be effective. Topics will include cleaning ears, making the antibiotic choices for topical therapy, and the best practices for topical therapy.

Best Practices for Otitis Externa: Selecting and Using the Best Topical Products
In this session, we’ll continue our discussion of best practices for otitis by reviewing the commercial ear products that are available and then discuss how to select the best product for various types of cases…from easy, first-occurrence otitis to chronic recurring Pseudomonas infections. Along the way, we’ll talk about some of the other difficult problems related to otitis, such as hyperplastic changes.




Andrew Rosenfeld, DVM, DABVP
Medical Director, Abaxis Global Diagnostics, Union City, California
SPONSORED BY Abaxis

The 30 Second Triage Examination
The course focuses on how to train your medical team to understand how to triage and evaluate the ill and emergency patient in respects to the physical examination and medical history.

Obtaining the Minimal Clinical Database of the Ill-Patient
This lecture content will focus on how to evaluate a patient initially with specific clinical diagnostics to evaluate stability, identify a problem list and implement treatment to help stabilize the emergency patient.

Utilizing Acid / Base in Everyday Practice
The overall goal of this program is to help medical teams be able understand acid / base analysis, its use in the diagnostic process, how to identify the cause of acidosis, and develop treatment protocols. Key factors in this program will focus on how to understand the importance of blood gas analysis in the diagnostic evaluation of the ill patient, be able to differentiate between metabolic and respiratory acidosis, develop a differential disease list for the metabolic acidosis patient, identify diagnostic and treatment protocols for the ill patient.

The Diagnostics of the Vomiting / Diarrhea Patient
This lecture content will focus on clinical evaluation of the diarrhea and vomiting patient utilizing point of care diagnostics, blood film evaluation, and the use of lateral flow diagnostic testing to help differentiate patient’s that require a full diagnostic work up and those that can be treated conservatively. Course material will be an interactive case based format.

Urinalysis, Microalbuminuria and Urine Protein Creatine Ratio
This lecture will discuss the importance of the urinalysis (as done as a point of care diagnostic), a discussion of evaluating microalbuminuria to help evaluate early glomerular and systemic disease, and lastly the lecture will focus on the importance of urine protein / creatinine ratio in diagnosing and treating specific forms of renal disease.

Ill Patient Jeopardy
At the end of the course, interactive case rounds will take the audience through cases that stress the basics of triage, emergency diagnostics and emergency care.



Steven Rosenthal, DVM, DACVIM (Cardiology)
Staff Veterinarian, CVCA Cardiac Care for Pets, Towson, Maryland
SPONSORED BY CVCA

An Epic Change in the Management of Mitral Valve Disease
New data has altered the approach to the management of degenerative valve disease in dogs. We will review the latest information regarding the management of pre-clinical mitral valve disease.

Updated Management of Feline Heart Disease: Pimobendan and Newer Antithrombotic Agents
Cardiac disease is present in a high percentage of the feline population. Pimobendan has dominated the treatment of heart failure in the dog and is starting to find its place in the management of feline heart disease. In addition, a number of newer agents are being used to manage the risk of thromboembolic disease. We will review the uses of these agents.





Kacie Schmitt, DVM, DACVIM (Cardiology)
Associate Cardiologist, CVCA Cardiac Care for Pets, Frederick, Maryland
SPONSORED BY CVCA

Case-based Approach to Evaluation and Management of Arrhythmias
The most commonly encountered arrhythmias in dogs and cats are similar, although the relative frequency and clinical significance may be different. They may result from wither cardiac or non-cardiac diseases, and an underlying etiology should always be sought and, if possible, specifically treated. This case-based format will encourage participation from attendees as the evaluation and management of the most commonly diagnosed arrhythmias in veterinary medicine are reviewed.

Cardiologist’s Approach to Thoracic Radiography
Thoracic radiographs are a mainstay of diagnostic imaging. While informative, they are also complicated. The contrast provided by the lungs, soft tissue, and radiographic changes within the lungs are easy to see, but hard to interpret. Radiographic technique and positioning is the most important aspect of thoracic radiographic interpretation. Despite perfect radiographs, a normal thorax is still often the most difficult to interpret. Through this lecture, we will review thoracic technique and positioning, principles of interpretation, and examples of common radiographic findings in cardiac patients.





Julia Shih, VMD, DACVIM (Cardiology)
Associate Cardiologist, CVCA Cardiac Care for Pets, Towson, Maryland
SPONSORED BY CVCA

Syncope: Pathophysiology and Differential Diagnoses
Syncope is a common presentation for veterinary patients, but diagnosis can be challenging due to the intermittent nature of clinical signs and a large and varied differential diagnosis list. A thorough understanding of the various differentials for syncope is useful in helping to narrow down the potential causes in a patient and is critical in determining the appropriate course of treatment. This lecture will focus on the pathophysiology of syncope and the various conditions which can result in syncope in the veterinary patient.

Syncope: Clinical Approach Through Case Examples
Syncope is a diagnostically challenging syndrome in veterinary medicine. This lecture will focus on the diagnostic approach for the syncopal patient and will discuss treatment of syncope after a diagnosis has been obtained through the use of case examples.





Carlo Siracusa, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVB, DECAWBM
Clinical Assistant Professor of Animal Behavior and Director, Animal Behavior Service, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Low-Stress Handling: The Behavior Body System and the Stress Response
This session will discuss how changes in the body systems of an animal cause behavior changes, and how body systems respond to perceived threats and challenges. Understanding the physiology of behavior and stress is fundamental to recognize distress signs in our patients and take an appropriate action to minimize it.

Low-Stress Handling: Understanding Canine Communication and Responding Appropriately
This session will review how dogs communicate with conspecifics and humans, and how they express their distress during veterinary visits. We will also illustrate how veterinarians and owners should respond to a dog’s stress signal to maximize welfare and safety.

Low-Stress Handling: Managing the Distressed Canine Patient During Veterinary Visits
This session will illustrate handling strategies and techniques to minimize the distress of canine patients during veterinary visits.

Low-Stress Handling: Understanding Feline Communication and Responding Appropriately
This session will review how cats communicate with conspecifics and humans, and how they express their distress during the veterinary visit. We will also illustrate how veterinarians and owners should respond to a cat’s stress signals to maximize welfare and safety.

Low-Stress Handling: Managing the Distressed Patient During Veterinary Visits
This session will illustrate handling strategies and techniques to minimize the distress of feline patients during veterinary visits.

Low-Stress Handling: Understanding How Physical and Medical Conditions Influence the Behavior of Our Patients
This session will give an overview of how physical and medical conditions influence the behavior and stress of our patients. An emphasis will be placed on the effect of pain, sensory and cognitive decline.